Apple History in Pictures – The Start 1976 – 1984 – Photo Gallery

| October 30, 2011 | 14 Comments
1976: Apple-Co-Founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

1976: Apple-Co-Founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

In 1975, Steve Wozniak withdrew from UC-Berkeley to build computers with former co-worker Steve Jobs. There they founded Apple and built their first personal computer, the Apple I, on April, 1st 1976.

1976: Apple's Third Founder: Ronald Wayne

1976: Apple's Third Founder: Ronald Wayne

Ronald Wayne founded Apple Computer with Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, but soon gave up his share of the new company for a total of $2,300.

1976: Apple's First Logo

1976: Apple's First Logo

Apple's first logo was designed by Ron Wayne. It depicts Sir Isaac Newton sitting under an apple tree. Almost immediately, though, this was replaced by Rob Janoff's "rainbow Apple", the famous rainbow-colored silhouette of an apple with a bite taken out of it.

1976: Apple Garage

1976: Apple Garage

Jobs' dad removed the car-restoration equipment from his garage to give his son and Steve Wozniak a rudimentary workshop. By the end of the Seventies they had moved into an office suite about four miles to the southeast, in Cupertino. The current ownership of the property is unknown, but the site is visited by many Silicon Valley tourists. Apple Garage 2066 Crist Drive Los Altos, Calif.

1976: Inside the Apple Garage

1976: Inside the Apple Garage

Steve Wozniak had a Ham Radio license in the 6th grade, and was influenced by his father who had a job in an electronics field, and who taught young Steve the basics of electronic components.

1976: Building "Blue Boxes"

1976: Building "Blue Boxes"

Steve Wozniak built one of the first digital "blue box" which allowed them to make [illegal] toll-free calls. Steve Jobs told the story of the blue box in a video from the Santa Clara Valley Historical Association. The last line Jobs utters in this video is "if we hadn't built blue boxes, there would have been no Apple."

1976: Inside the Apple Garage

1976: Inside the Apple Garage

1976: Apple I - Mainboard

1976: Apple I - Mainboard

The Apple I was sold as a motherboard (with CPU, RAM, and basic textual-video chips)—less than what is today considered a complete personal computer. Steve Wozniak was honored 1997 as a Fellow Awards Recipient at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View -- for his "invention of the first single-board microprocessor-based microcomputer, the Apple I."

1976: Apple I

1976: Apple I

The Apple I went on sale in July 1976 and was market-priced at $666.66 ($2,572 in 2011 dollars, adjusted for inflation.)

1976 Apple I Personal Computer Kit

1976 Apple I Personal Computer Kit

The Apple I personal computer were hand-built by Wozniak and first shown to the public at the Homebrew Computer Club.

1977: Apple's rainbow logo

1977: Apple's rainbow logo

The Apple logo in 1977 created by Rob Janoff with the rainbow color theme used until 1998.

1977: Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

1977: Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

1977: Apple II

1977: Apple II

The Apple II; it was presented to the public at the first West Coast Computer Faire on April 16 and April 17, 1977.

1977: Mike Markkula

1977: Mike Markkula

Mike Markkula was introduced to Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak when they were looking for funding to manufacture the Apple II personal computer they had developed, after having sold some units of the first version of this computer, the Apple I. With this guidance and funding, Apple ceased to be a partnership and was incorporated as a company.

1977: Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs

1977: Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs

1977: Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

1977: Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

1980: Apple III

1980: Apple III

The Apple III (often rendered as Apple ///) is a business-oriented personal computer produced and released by Apple Computer that was intended as the successor to the Apple II series, but largely considered a failure in the market.

1981: Apple HQ in Cupertino

1981: Apple HQ in Cupertino

1983: Apple’s “Macintosh” Almost Became The “Bicycle”

1983: Apple’s “Macintosh” Almost Became The “Bicycle”

The Apple Macintosh computer was originally named by early Apple employee Jef Raskin – after his favourite type of apple. When Raskin was forced to leave Apple in February 1981, Steve Jobs and Rod Holt decided to change the name of the Macintosh to “Bicycle” to distance themselves from Raskin. The thinking behind selecting the name “Bicycle” stemmed from an article that Jobs had read in Scientific American that highlighted the efficiency of the bicycle. Jobs had regularly referred to computers as a “bicycle for the mind” in interviews after reading the magazine article.

1983: Apple Lisa

1983: Apple Lisa

The Apple Lisa was the first personal computer to offer a graphical user interface in an inexpensive machine aimed at individual business users. Development of the Lisa began in 1978 as a powerful personal computer with a graphical user interface (GUI) targeted toward business customers. In 1982, Steve Jobs was forced out of the Lisa project, so he joined the Macintosh project instead. The Macintosh is not a direct descendant of Lisa, although there are obvious similarities between the systems and the final revision, the Lisa 2/10, was modified and sold as the Macintosh XL.

1983: Key member of the Apple Lisa team - Paul Baker, Bruce Daniels, Chris Franklin, Rich Page, John Couch, Larry Tesler

1983: Key member of the Apple Lisa team - Paul Baker, Bruce Daniels, Chris Franklin, Rich Page, John Couch, Larry Tesler

The Apple Lisa project began in 1978 as an effort to create a more modern version of the then-conventional design epitomized by the Apple II. Initial team lead Ken Rothmuller was soon replaced by John Couch, under whose direction the project evolved to the 'windows & mouse-driven' form that was finally released. Bruce Daniels was in charge of applications development, and Larry Tesler was in charge of system software.

1983: Apple Lisa inventory

1983: Apple Lisa inventory

The Apple Lisa was a commercial failure for Apple, the largest since the failure of the Apple III of 1980. The intended business customers were reluctant to purchase the machine because of its high price (nearly $10,000), making it largely unable to compete with the less expensive IBM PCs, which were already beginning to dominate business desktop computing. The largest Lisa customer was NASA, which used LisaProject for project management and was eventually faced with significant problems when the Lisa was discontinued. In 1989, Apple disposed of approximately 2,700 unsold Lisas in a guarded landfill in Logan, Utah, in order to receive a tax write-off on the unsold inventory. Like other early GUI computers, working Lisas are now fairly valuable collectors items, for which people will pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars. The original model is the most sought after, although working ProFile and Widget hard disks, which are necessary for running the Lisa OS, are also particularly valued.

1984: Apple Lisa and Apple Macintosh

1984: Apple Lisa and Apple Macintosh

The Apple Lisa was immediately recognized as a significant machine, with Byte for example opining it more important than the IBM PC. Further, though a limited number of Lisas were sold, the Lisa software, in combination with an Apple dot-matrix printer, could produce documents that surpassed other comparably-priced options available at the time. This one compelling usage meant that the Lisa was introduced into a number of larger offices, and due to the price, the number of people who had used a Lisa was much larger than the number of Lisas sold.[

1984_01_apple_macintosh_1984

1984_01_apple_macintosh_1984

1984_01_bill_attkinson_credit_st_mac

1984_01_bill_attkinson_credit_st_mac

1984_01_jobs_sculley_mac

1984_01_jobs_sculley_mac

1984_apple_IIc_jobs_sculley_wozniak_

1984_apple_IIc_jobs_sculley_wozniak_

1984_apple_IIc_steve_jobs_wozniak

1984_apple_IIc_steve_jobs_wozniak

1984_Apple_IIc_with_monitor_wikipedia

1984_Apple_IIc_with_monitor_wikipedia

1984_Macintosh_Anzeige

1984_Macintosh_Anzeige

1984_macintosh_desk

1984_macintosh_desk

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  1. Jared says:

    I used your old apple logo image on my blog, Thanks!
    http://brandingspiration.blogspot.com/

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